How to Manage an Older Workforce Amid Rising Millennials

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ORLANDO — While millennials may be entering the workforce across a wide range of industries, it’s still “vitally important” to make sure that the Baby Boomers and Gen Xers feel relevant at a company, said Kelly Joscelyne, global talent officer at Mastercard, said at CBA Live 2018.

While speaking at the “Workforce of the Future” panel, the topic of catering to millennials was discussed, but it was urged that there is still merit in making the older members of the company feel useful and involved.

“There has to be a balance,” said Michael Rochelle, chief strategy officer at research and analyst firm Brandon Hall Group. “They want to contribute. [We need to] make every aspect of our talent strategy about collaboration, socialization, knowledge transfer. It’s about getting us all on a level-playing field where I can teach you something and you can teach me something.”

Rochelle went on to say that he felt some organizations tend to “overcompensate” when it comes to newer employees, but employers will find that the older generation is more likely to stay with the company for longer periods of time.

“Another thing about this new workforce is that these millennials have had six or seven jobs by the time they are in their 30s, Rochelle said. “[Baby Boomers] are folks that are willing to stay for a longer period of time because they’ve built legacies. They want to be tapped in and they can actually be the most stable part of your workforce. You just have to create a level of importance about it.”

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